Nappily Ever After: A Black woman’s journey to self-discovery now on Netflix

nappily every after - sanaa lathan

I’m super excited about the premiere of Nappily Ever After on Netflix.

The movie is based on the book by Trisha R. Thomas. It’s refreshing to see the narrative concerning the relationship that Black women have with our natural hair and how it affects our sense of self and relationships. I remember the first time that I ever chopped off my hair. I never had much, to begin with, but like many Black girls, that was mainly due to breakage and damage caused by perms that we were taught to live by in our communities.

I dabbled with natural hair in high school but social pressures and a lack of guidance concerning natural hair care brought me back to the perm. There were no natural hair Youtube gurus back then. Growing up in a small town, I was pretty much on my own. As soon as I graduated, I cut off every bit of permed hair and started growing locs. It was a liberating experience that was one of my entry points to womanhood. I had chosen to embrace my natural kinks and that process led me on a road to self-discovery and empowerment.

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Nappily Ever After showcases a similar experience.

Additionally, I think it’s great that this movie ties in how Black women’s decision to wear our natural hair has an effect on our dating lives. I’ve found it to be a blessing. Natural hair is a simple ignorance deterrent. It helped me to stay clear of men obsessed with European standards of beauty. No Black woman should be dating them anyway.  What some view as a diss is really a blessing in disguise.

Many of my sister-friends have shared similar stories. I’ve enjoyed watching Sanaa Lathan share the ups and downs of our experiences in a positive light on a major platform.

Nappily Ever After is not only about hair. It’s a story about a Black woman’s journey to self-discovery and the reclamation of her life.

Read the movie synopsis below and Happy Watching!

Violet Jones has a seemingly flawless life – a great job, a handsome doctor boyfriend, and a meticulously maintained perfect coiffure. But after an accident at the hair-dresser, each of these things start to unravel, and Violet begins to realize that she was living the life she thought she was supposed to live, not the one that she really wanted. Starring Sanaa Lathan, Ricky Whittle, Lyriq Bent with Ernie Hudson and Lynn Whitfield. Nappily Ever After premieres September 21st only on Netflix.

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Why More Black People Should Be Blood Donors

DNA

Though millions of people worldwide suffer from Sickle Cell Disease, the general public is still very uninformed about its impact. It’s estimated that about 300,000 children are born with the disease each year. (Source NPR)

According to the CDC, “SCD is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. Healthy red blood cells are round, and they move through small blood vessels to carry oxygen to all parts of the body. In someone who has SCD, the red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a ‘sickle.’ The sickle cells die early, which causes a constant shortage of red blood cells. Also, when they travel through small blood vessels, they get stuck and clog the blood flow. This can cause pain and other serious problems such infection, acute chest syndrome and stroke.”

Some people, like myself, have the Sickle Cell Trait but not the disease. This means that we have, “one sickle cell gene and one normal gene.” Sickle Cell Disease can occur when both parents of a child have the trait. In this case, there is a 25% chance of the child having SCD. (Source CDC )

Though Sickle Cell Disease affects people from various ethnic backgrounds, it is highly prevalent in people of African descent. The Sickle Cell Trait may have developed as a natural resistant to Malaria. Researchers believe,”Due to its protective effect against malaria, the sickle mutation may have been naturally selected in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria is endemic and one of the major causes of death.” (Source Science Daily)

Some patients require blood transfusions to treat severe anemia. This is where Black blood donors come in because people of similar ethnic backgrounds are more likely to have the same blood type. The success of transfusions highly depends on the similarity in blood types.

Recently one blood donation center encountered some confusion about this and was even accused of being racist for asking for more Black blood donors. Check out their excellent and informative response below:

Based on the explanation above, more Black blood donors will save more Black lives affected by Sickle Cell Disease. Unfortunately, the medical field is highly distrusted by many communities of African descent due to past and recent mistreatment and abuse (Source TheHill). Still the need for Black blood donors exists and would benefit Black patients greatly.

 

Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor is the founder of OurLegaci.com. To reach Jessica, email her at OurLegaci@gmail.com. Follow her on Facebook at Facebook.com/JAMAiwuyor.

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